What's the difference in RPM


#21

Most important is rather the latency, you can try all 8 recons with no filters and see what will be the latency. There should be a diffrence.


#22

honestly it’s not impressive as i think.
hope ultimare is “at least” really close to 500.


#23

@less_is_more more than 200RPM is for me too much. The steering-wheel will be too fast for Drift or to drive old cars with 900° or more…

Example of FFB Steering wheel used by Universities or car companies…


#24

During internal development testing, we could not exceed ~2.5-2.8 RPS during most severe tests with Indycar at Sebring, at 26nm torque. . 500RPM is already 8.33RPS.

So why do we need that high (and very unusable)) servo-speed again?

Anyway, all SC2 servos have good healthy overhead, but also cleverly designed/selected to fall within all requirements for sim-use.


#25

Why are some so obsessed with RPM?
The parameters we should concentrate on is the latency and the max torque slew rate the motor is capable of. And on top of that to bring in the equation the steering wheel one is using, and what filters (mainly dampening) one is running, cause that will have some real effect, everything else is mere numbers.
Even the old Simucube is good for about 220-240RPM, that’s 3,66 turns per second, or 1317° per second, so more then the steering lock of any reasonable road car, and almost 2-3 times the steering lock of a race car. So, taking a typical GT car with 540° lock, you can still go from lock to lock in 0,41 s, or from going straight into full lock in 0,2 s. And to make the typical correction of, lets say, a 90° flick to catch the rear, the wheel only needs 70 ms. That’s bloody fast.
I could only think of some crazy japanese drifters, who flick their car from lock to lock at high speeds, that would bring a typical DD wheel to its limits.